unfair competition law

What’s In Your Arbitration Agreement?

California High Court Finds Another Exception to Enforcing Arbitration Agreements As Written

April 13, 2017

By Suzanne Steinke and Mazen Khatib

Many employers enter into pre-dispute arbitration agreements with their employees so that any future claims or disputes between the employer and the employee get resolved through binding arbitration, rather than a court of law. The United States Supreme Court has traditionally favored the enforcement of such arbitration agreements as written. This has included approving agreements that contain a waiver of the right to bring a class action in any forum, meaning that an employer and an employee must resolve all disputes in arbitration and on an individual, not class-wide, basis. This class action waiver is significant for employers because an employee is stopped from bringing any claim in court or arbitration to benefit and on behalf of any employees other than herself.

California courts have been reluctant to fully embrace pre-dispute arbitration agreements, even though they are generally required to follow U.S. Supreme Court pronouncements in this area. Although California’s highest court has finally accepted that class action waivers in arbitration agreements are enforceable, with its recent decision in McGill v. Citibank, it once again shows its willingness to find exceptions to avoid fully enforcing these agreements as written. (more…)