startups

Moving Startups Forward: Tips for Responding To A Patent Troll

By Alesha Dominique

Startups are increasingly vulnerable to demand letters and lawsuits from “patent trolls” looking for opportunities to extract quick settlements from small companies with limited resources to defend against claims of patent infringement.  To protect your business, developing a thoughtful approach for responding to such non-practicing entities is essential.  Here are 5 tips for moving forward:

1. Don’t Panic. When confronted with a patent demand letter or infringement lawsuit from a non-practicing entity, it is perfectly understandable to be upset.  You have likely invested substantial sums of money into your business and/or product, and now feel that the investment is under attack.  Maintaining your calm, however, will better enable you to think clearly and strategically about next steps.
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Visa Options for Foreign Investors and Entrepreneurs

Many Currency

Photo credit: iStock.com/Wara1982

By John E. Exner IV

Many U.S. startups are co-founded by foreign nationals, and for those that are not, all start-ups need capital. Fortunately, it is not necessary to limit the potential investor pool exclusively to U.S. citizens and permanent residents. A large number of U.S. startups are either co-founded or funded by foreign investors, and the U.S. government understands that in order to attract foreign investment into the U.S. economy there must be designated visa categories available to those investors. These specific visa categories were established to allow investors and co-founders to travel to the U.S. to manage and oversee their investment. While a wide variety of visas may be applicable to any situation, the two most common visa categories utilized by foreign investors and entrepreneurs are the E-2 and the L-1A “new office” visa. (more…)

Immigration Tips for Startups

By John E. Exner IV

10 tips to prepare for the most frequent immigration scenarios faced by startups:

World map created with passport stamps, travel concept

Photo credit: iStock.com/Delpixart

  1. If the company will be owned, in-whole or in-part by a foreign investor, immigration planning should start as early as possible – even before the company is established. There are visas available to foreign entrepreneurs who are investing a significant amount of money into a new U.S. business. This visa application process should be handled in concert with the creation of the business.
  2. If the U.S. business will have a foreign office (parent, subsidiary, or affiliate) the managers, executives, and essential personnel from the foreign office(s) may be able to travel to the United States on multinational transferee visas.
  3. If the U.S. business is recruiting from local U.S. universities and colleges, many of these candidates may be foreign nationals on U.S. student visas. These individuals may be eligible for at least one year of employment authorization in the U.S. following graduation. (more…)