employers

The Only Thing Certain is Uncertainty

Detail Of A USA VisaBy Frida P. Glucoft and David S. Rugendorf 

Workplace immigration law has been the focal point of increased anxiety and uncertainty because of various changes proposed by Executive Order. Discussions have heated up considerably in the offices of human resources professionals and personnel managers, in the break room, around the water cooler, as well as in the news media and on social media. Because the changes have not come in the form of formal regulatory changes through legislation, which require a prescribed notice and comment period (though those may soon be on the way), changes in enforcement priorities and how existing laws are interpreted create an unclear path about who will be impacted and when the new Executive Order priorities will be instituted.

What are these new priorities? At present they are best explained in Executive Order 13788. (more…)

Data Breaches: An Employer’s Duty to Protect Employees’ Personal Information

By Aaron Wais

An appellate court in Pennsylvania recently dismissed an employee class action against their employer over a data breach, holding that the employer did not have a duty to protect its employees’ personal information (e.g., names, birth dates, social security numbers, bank information, etc.).  While this was a significant victory for employers, non-Pennsylvania employers should temper their enthusiasm because courts in other states, including California, have made clear that employers do have a legal duty to protect their employees’ personal information. These courts have also made clear that the liability for a data breach differs when an employer has legally compliant, written policies for safeguarding private information and responding to data breaches in a timely manner.

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Federal Court Lowers the Boom on DOL’s Higher Salary Regulation

November 23, 2016

By Erica Parks

It has been a rough few weeks for the Department of Labor (“DOL”) in Texas federal court. Yesterday in Sherman, Texas, U.S. District Judge Amos Mazzant granted a nationwide preliminary injunction temporarily blocking the DOL’s new overtime regulations, which were scheduled to take effect on December 1, 2016. As we alerted you last month, those regulations would, among other things, nearly double the salary basis required to qualify for any of the “white collar” exemptions from federal overtime laws. Opponents of the rule have argued that it oversteps the authority granted to the DOL by Congress. (more…)

Labor and Employment Tips for Startups

By Samantha E. Becker

labor-and-employment-tips-image

Photo credit: iStock.com/LeoWolfert

Here are 10 employment tips to prevent your start-up from losing ground before it gets started:

  1. Make sure you understand the differences between employees and independent contractors and follow all legal requirements when it comes to wages, benefits and terms of employment. Distinguishing employees from independent contractors is complex and fact-specific (the IRS uses a 20-factor test!) and errors can result in costly litigation down the road.
  2. Don’t classify employees as salaried to avoid paying for overtime and/or other benefits. Most employees in a company should be paid on an hourly basis and even salaried employees can later try to sue for unpaid wages and overtime, penalties, and attorneys’ fees.
  3. You cannot pay equity to avoid paying minimum wages. Make sure you pay employees for their regular and overtime hours worked based on the rates set forth by state and federal laws. (more…)